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This code, firmware, schematics, and documentation is provided “AS IS” and the responsibility for its operation is yours. You are not permitted to redistribute this code as “Eleven code” after having made changes. If you're going to re-distribute the source, we require that you make it clear in the source that the code was descended from Eleven code libraires, but that you've made changes. No warranties are made regarding the ability of this code to comply with applicable FCC/IC/ETSI or other regulations.

University of Alberta Projects

  • (XInC2) Inertial Navigation

    ZIP [1.5M]

    2010
    Group Photo [272k]

    University of Alberta Student Project using XInC2 by Aria Abedi, Eric Chalmers, Rambukkanage "Dan" Fernando, Nicole Malenczak, and Jason Urness. The report describes the design of an inertial measurement unit for use in platform stabilization and control. The device measures the displacement from a set input orientation and corrects the platform attitude to the set input.

  • (XInC2) Vital Signs Monitor

    ZIP [3.8M]

    2010
    Group Photo [252k]

    University of Alberta Student Project using XInC2(XC1501 SiP) by Yam Amoako-Tuffour, Zanda Lumanglas, Kyle Murray, and Michael Sumka. This report outlines the design of a wireless vital signs monitor that consists of a transmitter(containing the sensors), a receiver, and USB-Computer interface. Sensors monitor body temperature, pulse rate, and blood oxygen saturation.

  • (XInC2) Home Automation

    ZIP [1.9M]

    2010
    Group Photo [228k]

    University of Alberta Student Project using XInC2 by Perry Hofbauer, Travis Jensen, Stephen Kiem, Travis Schoepp, and Eric Stafford. The XInC2 powered home automation system allows users to monitor the power consumption of various electronics and at the same time, control on/off intervals to reduce the power consumed. Users can also use two separate tracking devices and a web-based GUI for controlling the automation.

  • (XInC2) Power Quality Detector

    ZIP [840k]

    2010
    Group Photo [236k]

    University of Alberta Student Project using XInC2 by David Kraft, Daniel Lang, Katherine Thomas, and Daryl Tran. The report outlines the design, testing, and fabrication of an accurate high voltage power quality detector. This detector can be useful in testing and storing power quality characteristics of any high voltage industrial machine.

  • (XInC2) Audio Normalizer

    ZIP [10M]

    2010
    Group Photo [252k]

    University of Alberta Student Project using XInC2 by Eric Bennett, Navid Madjidifar, Fransisco Marques-Stricker, Roman Soltykevych, and Andrew Yang. This report outlines the design of an audio normalizer system that reads in stereo audio signals, identifies commercials, and applies dynamic range compression (in real time) to reduce the effects of program-to-commercial volume spikes.

  • (XInC2) Mini Sumo Robot

    ZIP [1.1M]

    2009
    Group Photo [264k]

    University of Alberta Student Project using XInC2 by Jian-Lok Chang, Edwin Li, Lu Ma, Lee Richard, and Josh Sparrow. This report outlines the design of an autonomous mini-sumo robot. The robot relies solely on infrared, ultrasonic, encoder and line detector sensors to operate autonomously within a 77cm diameter ring. The robot weights under 500g and has a 10x10cm base.

  • (XInC2) 900MHz Ethernet Car Jukebox Updater

    ZIP [280k]

    2009

    University of Alberta Student Project using XInC2 by D. Leger, B. Rose, R. Wollenberg, K. Gavrikov. The objective of the project is to wirelessly download music to a mass storage device located in the user’s vehicle within a range of about 25 meters. Based around the XInC2 microcontroller, the data link is composed of two devices. The XInC2 microcontroller serves as the brain behind both devices.

  • (XInC2) Fly Tracker Project

    ZIP [304k]

    2009
    Group Photo [260k]

    University of Alberta Student Project using XInC2 by Serguei Klink, Curtis Ostergren, Thomas Schaller, Jon Vandenbrink. The project uses CMOS camera sensor for tracking, two hobby servos for tracker movement, and has a basic user interface provided by an LCD and a keypad. A laser pointer is tracked in order to demonstrate successful completion of the project.

  • (XInC2) Home Automation

    ZIP [1.3M]

    2009
    Group Photo [276k]

    University of Alberta Student Project using XInC2 by Tyler Born, Habib Halabi, Dale Latin, Marcin Misiewicz. This project involves the design of a home automation system. The system consists of a remote control and two distinct room modules. and it can edit the settings for each user's key-tag. The bedroom module controls lighting, door access, and multipurpose relays.

  • (XInC2) Absolute Hovercraft

    ZIP [1012k]

    2009
    Group Photo [272k]

    University of Alberta Student Project using XInC2 by Arashdeep Brar, Jordon Davis, Will Hatch. This report describes the design and testing of an absolute hovercraft. The hovercraft runs on power supplied by batteries and operates using a XInC2 microprocessor along with wireless capabilities, and a keypad which can act as a limited remote.

  • (XInC2) Autonomous Sumo Robot

    ZIP [652k]

    2008
    Group Photo [309k]

    University of Alberta Student Project using XInC2 by S. Chow, M. Hui, S. Merryfield, and N. Schwinghamer. This report will present a quick overview of the design, implementation, and results of an Autonomous Sumo Robot (TITAN) developed with an intent to compete in a sumo competition.

  • (XInC2) Surround Sound Quick Calibrator

    ZIP [708k]

    2008
    Group Photo [296k]

    University of Alberta Student Project using XInC2 by K. Green, K. Huggard, T. Matier, and Q. White. This report reveals the design of a quick surround sound calibrator which is used to help home theater consumers improve their surround sound experience. By altering the gain and delay of each speaker in the system to counteract speaker placement constraints and room acoustics that can affect the quality of the audio.

  • (XInC2) Vehicle Detector

    ZIP [672k]

    2008
    Group Photo [309k]

    University of Alberta Student Project using XInC2 by C. Ruff, C. Storey, J. Daniels, and D. Hayden. This paper outlines the results of the hardware and firmware design of an operational vehicle detector used in driveways. Using wireless transmission and ultrasonic detectors, a remote unit communicates with a base (home) unit. The base unit alerts homeowners, notifies the incoming vehicle that it is being monitored, and logs data.

  • (XInC2) Wireless Mixing Board

    ZIP [412k]

    2008
    Group Photo [305k]

    University of Alberta Student Project using XInC2 by A. Greschner, D. Wong, J. Xu, and H. Zeng. The sound mixer board has traditionally been connected with cables to the input consoles. For large sound mixers, these cables can be numerous, long, and a nuisance. Outlined in the following report is a prototype of a wireless sound mixer that will remove the physical connections and allow the user to make adjustments remotely.

  • (XInC2) Wireless Power Consumption Monitor

    ZIP [740k]

    2008
    Group Photo [257k]

    University of Alberta Student Project using XInC2 by Garrett Axani, William Swanson, Xiaoqin Lei, and Yonghui Liang. This report summarizes the design of a wireless power consumption monitor project. The project monitors the power consumed by numerous household electrical devices simultaneously. With a multi-slave/single-master structure, it can track multiple devices and relay the data back to the master control unit and display the data in a monetary format.

  • Wireless 3D Mouse Sample Project

    ZIP [470k]

    04/06/2006

    University of Alberta Student Project using WHAM2 modules by Mercier, Koss, Crowley, and Ho. The freedom of a wireless device, combined with the functionality of a computer mouse, allows more interaction and flexibility for digital computer presentations... This paper provides the details of the design, testing, and integration process in the development of a wireless 3D mouse.

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Audio Projects

  • Aquarius Speakers

    ZIP [28.1M]

    08/19/2009

    The Aquarius System contain one transmitter (Tx) and two receiver speakers (Rx) equipped with Eleven's wireless modules. Each Rx also contains a TAS series Class D amplifier capable of outputting 30W on each channel. Speakers can be set up through firmware to have left, right, or stereo audio channels. For true portability, the speakers each contain a battery that can provide up to 5 hours of continuous audio. This kit is geared towards stereo audio applications, not subwoofer. The Aquarius Speakers can use the following modules: HT Series: HT-202, HT-204, HT-222, HT-502, and MR Series: MR-284.

  • Cecille Speakers

    ZIP [4.73M]

    08/19/2009

    This miniature dongle for iPhone/iPod bonds to two independent wireless, battery-powered portable speakers. Each speaker has its own batteries, amplifier and wireless module. The dongle is featureless having no switches, buttons or batteries. Volume control of the speakers is done by simply changing the volume on the iPhone/iPod itself—the volume level is “extracted” from iPhone/iPod and wirelessly sent to the speakers. Ultimate portability. Ultimate flexibility. Ultimate freedom.

  • USB dongle Tx for Cecille

    ZIP [156k]

    08/21/2009

    This reference schematic is the basic design for USB wireless audio transmission from a PC to speakers that can be within the room or around the home. Many options and features can be added to customize the design for your product.

  • Home Theater and Multi-Room

    ZIP [3.83M]

    08/19/2009

    The concept of universal short-haul RF interoperability is not necessarily a feasible nor desireable characteristic for all wireless systems. Depending on the target application area, different degrees of interoperability may be desired.

  • Semi Pro Audio

    ZIP [2M]

    08/19/2009

    Multithreaded embedded processors, especially those with system-on-a-chip (SOC) capabilities, are an excellent solution for portable and wireless devices. Having all these functions integrated into a single chip dramatically reduce overall system costs.

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